Thursday, June 15, 2017

Summer Transition

There's always a bit of lag time between the end of school and the start of summer: time when we haven't quite figured out the new rhythms. Time when some of us feel more edgy/less comfortable/not relaxed. Yesterday, 10 days into summer, it started to feel like we were finally reaching the new summer equilibrium. I do think it takes that long.


I often heard people in Germany say that you should never go on vacation for less than two weeks, because it takes at least one week to stop thinking about work. We don't think that way AT ALL here in the US, but I do believe there's some truth to it. Three day vacations are pretty much the worst: you spend all the time anxious and prepping (prepping to leave, anxious to be in a new situation, and prepping to return) and no time relaxing. Ironically, we've actually codified this miserable experience with wisdom like: Fish and visitors stink after three days (credit Benjamin Franklin). No wonder we have an epidemic of ADHD here in the United States; we're culturally way too quick to change course when things feel slightly uncomfortable. We can't make it through the transition to the enjoyable part. We give up – while quoting our efficient founding father – even when it comes to vacation.

2 comments:

Pregnantly Plump said...

I like the cake. I am one of those bad vacationers. We did a nine day trip with my parents, and I was done at day 7. I really like being home. Long vacations are hard for me. But I think I'm just not very good at vacations.

Unknown said...

It is probably something one needs to learn - going on a vacation for a longer time requires a different state of mind.
Going on a city trip with the family has a different dynamic than going on a beach vacation for two weeks. The second one has a learning curve for us as a family. But if you don't give up after the first week, the second week can be so rewarding. Dolce far niente - that's the state of mind that helps you relax deeply.
Very cool cake, by the way!!!