Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The soothing sound of...Popcorn?

I once heard a lecture about sensory processing in children that discussed how different activities, and the act of eating different kinds of food, could help children feel more organized and calm. The list of possible activities was really gigantic, depending on the personality and needs of each individual child. I still love to pull out this list and use it when I'm feeling rather desperate.

[photo removed]

One of my favorites, lately, is popcorn for an afternoon snack. Something about all that popping followed by crunchy eating seems to calm both the boys. We make our popcorn on the stovetop, using coconut oil, in the cast iron wok. I find in the wok, I can get away without the violent pot/pan shaking. Also, the boys love watching the kernels pop through the glass lid.

It's possible popcorn got a bad reputation as a snack sometime in the past 20 years; but I can find much bigger evils than popcorn in the boys' diets. And I'm picking my battles carefully these days.

4 comments:

Swistle said...

I think popcorn's reputation must be purely based on toppings. Otherwise it ought to fit beautifully with the current "whole grains" emphasis, since it's nothing but whole grain.

Katie (Mama May I) said...

Popcorn is the snack of choice at our house. And since my little ones can always use an extra dose of fiber, I'm quick to make it.

clueless but hopeful mama said...

Popcorn is supposedly a chocking hazard. Like big time. I don't know why, exactly, I only know that someone had a total conniption about it on a message board once. (How's that for a standard Internet memory?)

I also find popcorn hard to tolerate, digestively speaking. So I've avoided it for my girls for that reason.

But! Totally a whole grain! Simple, real food! WIN!

Also, I'd very much like to see that sensory-lecture-list thingy, please and thank you.

Ann Wyse said...

Ohh. You're right, CBHM, there's a lot out there about popcorn as a choking hazard.

I'll see if I can figure out how to scan the sensory processing list for you.